Music Mondays: Bishop Briggs, Shuggie Otis, and A Perfect Circle


Bishop Briggs, Shuggie Otis, and A Perfect Circle

I’m just now getting home and this week’s post featuring Bishop Briggs, Shuggie Otis, and A Perfect Circle is going to have to be quick.

Bishop Briggs: Church of Scars

Bishop Briggs: Church of Scars

Perhaps you recognize Bishop Briggs from her single Wild Horses that accompanied an Acura commercial. Maybe you recognize her from her performance on The Tonight Show back in 2016. Yeah, I didn’t see either one. My first exposure to her music was from this past week’s debut release, Church of Scars. Vocally she packs the same punch as P!nk (hm, a P!nk cover of River). Musically, there’s a bit of Skrillex or Imagine Dragons. Stylistically, there’s a power in her performance – equal parts vulnerability and strength – that rivals many established artists.

For you Spotifyers:

Shuggie Otis: Inter-Fusion

Shuggie Otis: Inter-Fusion

The beauty in Shuggie Otis‘ latest album, Inter-Fusion is one could easily believe it’s a brand new release in the late 60s/early 70s. Or in the 2000s. It’s no wonder considering his only four studio albums came out in 1969, 1971, 1974, and 2018. 44 years is a long time between releases, but Shuggie hasn’t been musically absent all that time. He’s participated in other people’s albums throughout the years. Put this album on your favorite listening device, turn up the volume, grab your favorite beverage, and enjoy the trip through the decades.

For you Spotifyers:

A Perfect Circle: Eat the Elephant

A Perfect Circle: Eat the Elephant

There are a couple schools of thought when reviewing music. Judge an album compared to a band’s entire catalog or as an individual piece. Neither one is right or wrong, it’s simply what you want to make of it. Some might consider A Perfect Circle‘s Eat the Elephant a weak derivation from their earlier work. In those cases where a band jerks the steering wheel hard to the left, I prefer to view the album on its own merits. After all, there’s often an excellent reason for the radical departure beyond just attempting to cash in on a fad. Something transformative had to happen to lead a band to make that kind of album. With that in mind, Eat the Elephant stands well on its own two feet. The piano, strings, and slower tempos bring a darker form to light on the album.

For you Spotifyers:

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